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Academic Integrity Toolkit

The tools you need to help you succeed in university study

Reading lists

Reading around your topic will build your knowledge, draw out connections and support your critical analysis. You do not need to read everything on your reading list, but you will need to do more than just cite one or two books. Read a range of materials to develop your knowledge and understanding, and remember to be critical.

This guide will show you how to find and identify different types of resource on your reading list.

You may encounter some abbreviations you do not recognise on your reading list. For further help with these, please consult the Useful terms for referencing page in this LibGuide.

How can I tell what sort of material it is?

The details included for each item in your reading list will help to show you what kind of item it is.

A book will usually include author(s), title, publisher, date. It may include edition.

Eysenck, M.A. and Keane, M. (2010). Cognitive psychology: a student's handbook, 6th ed. Hove: Psychology Press.


A chapter in an edited collection will list author(s) and title of the individual chapter (including page numbers for its start and finish) as well as editor(s) and other details of the collection it is found in.

Tovey, B. (1996). Wisdom and the law. In J. Alulis and V. Sullivan (eds.) Shakespeare's political pageant. London: Rowman & Litchfield, 61-75.


A journal article will usually give author, date, article title, journal title, volume (and issue) number, page numbers.

Jung, S. (2009). Aqueous extraction of oil and protein from soybean and lupin: a comparative study. Journal of food processing and preservation, 33 (4), 547-559.

What kind of resource is this?

Identify the following items: book, chapter in an edited collection or journal article?

 

Dunford, M. and Smith, A. (1998). Uneven development in Europe. In Pinder, D. (ed.). The New Europe : economy, society and environment. Chichester: Wiley, 203-222.

 

Lechner, F.J. and Boli, J. (2004). The globalization reader. Oxford: Blackwell.

 

Wasson, R.J. and Hyde, R. (1983). Factors determining desert dune type. Nature, 304(5924), 337-339.

 

Sarre, R. D. (1987). Aeolian sand transport. Progress in Physical Geography, 11, 157-182

 

Barry, R.G. and Chorley, R.J. (2003). Atmosphere, weather and climate. London: Routledge.

 

These are the answers to the exercises:

 

Dunford, M. and Smith, A. (1998). Uneven development in Europe. In Pinder, D. (ed.). The New Europe : economy, society and environment, Chichester: Wiley, 203-222.

Chapter in an edited collection

Lechner, F.J. and Boli, J. (2004). The globalization reader. Oxford: Blackwell.

Book

Wasson, R.J. and Hyde, R. (1983). Factors determining desert dune type. Nature, 304(5924), 337-339.

Journal article

Sarre, R. D. (1987). Aeolian sand transport. Progress in Physical Geography, 11, 157-182

Journal article

Barry, R.G. and Chorley, R.J. (2003). Atmosphere, weather and climate. London: Routledge.

Book

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How can I find the materials in the Library catalogue?


 

Search for keywords – just like Google. The catalogue will tell you how many copies we have of a book, which floor it is on and whether it is out on loan. You will also find the location of a journal and whether we have an electronic version.

Here are some tips on keywords to use for different kinds of resource. Compare them to the resource examples above:


A book: use one of the author’s last names and one or two words from the title

e.g. eysenck cognitive psychology


A chapter in an edited collection: if you are searching in Enterprise, use one of the editors’ last names and one or two words from the book title, not the author and title of the chapter (Enterprise does not hold this information). If the Library has an electronic version of the book, you may find it by searching for the author and title of the chapter on Summon.

e.g. for the example above type alulis shakespeare's political NOT tovey wisdom


A journal article: Search Enterprise for the title of the journal in which the article was published. If the Library subscribes to an electronic version of the journal, you may find it by searching for the author and title of the article on Summon.

e.g. food processing preservation

Can you find these reading list items?

Find the answers to these questions on items or words you may find on reading lists. (You will need to search the online Library catalogue Enterprise for some of the answers.)
 

What do the initials CIOB stand for?

 

What does Ibid. mean?


 

Find the call number for Laurie, H. and Gershuny, J. (2000). Couples, work and money, in R. Berthoud and J. Gershuny, (eds.), Seven years in the lives of British families, Bristol: Policy Press, 25-37.

 

MLR is the abbreviation for a journal covering law. Find out what it means, then find the call number for the journal in the Library catalogue.

 

Search for the journal abbreviated as Art Hist. on Enterprise. Does the Library hold last year's issues of this journal?

 

These are the answers to the exercises:

 

What do the initials CIOB stand for?

Chartered Institute of Building

What does Ibid. mean?

An abbreviation of the Latin ibidem which means "the same as the preceding reference".

Find the Call Number for Laurie, H. and Gershuny, J. (2000). Couples, work and money, in R. Berthoud and J. Gershuny, (eds.), Seven years in the lives of British families, Bristol: Policy Press, 25-37.

301.240942-SEV

MLR is the abbreviation for a journal covering law. Find out what it means, then find the Call Number for the journal in the Library catalogue.

JOURNALS--PER 340.05 23

Search for the journal abbreviated as Art Hist. on Enterprise. Does the Library hold last year's issues of this journal?

Yes

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